MMCMWebBannerJan2014Shrunk.jpg

Legislate

legislate MMCM

Medical Marijuana Caregivers Maine has been in the State House every session since 2011 working to improve the state’s medical marijuana laws.

Educate

educate

We have an education team that teaches classes and provides info sessions on our Medical Marijuana Program law, business, best practices and more across the state for patients, caregivers, law enforcement .

Advocate

advocate MMCM

MMCM provides support to patients and caregivers across Maine with Municipality issues, Legal cases and correspondence with DHHS and other related agencies.

Congress Ties Jeff Sessions' Hands on Medical Marijuana

At least for now, the DOJ is likely to be barred from going after pot growers, sellers and users in states where medical weed's legal.
Attorney General Jeff Sessions is the bogey man to many in the nat...

Readmore

Interesting News!

With recreational marijuana sales on horizon, Maine's MMJ program surges

The medical marijuana program in Maine is red-hot, with the number of MMJ patients swelling in the past year. But the reason for...

Readmore

What a Great Idea…for our Caregivers!

A letter sent in by one of MMCM’s dedicated members at work.....

“Catherine you are a gem! A diplomatic, sane and logical voice for the MMJ program. Listening to you last night at MMCM monthly networki...

Readmore

MMCM Network Meetings

Networking Meetings in May 2017

 

Boothbay - May 24th, 2017 6:30pm-8:30pm BoatHouse Bistro Tapas Bar & Restaurant, 12 By-Way Boothbay Harbor, ME 04538

 

Networking Meetings in June 2017

 

Ba...

Readmore

Join us at Other Events

May 27th, 2017 NEVA Maine Meet & Greet BBQ 3:00pm – 7:00pm
Hosted by New England Veterans Alliance Inc
Held at Homegrown Healthcare of Maine
662 Stanley Rd Winthrop, ME

June 2nd, 2017 Captains of Indust...

Readmore

DEA Rejects Attempt To Loosen Federal Restrictions On Marijuana

Read the article HERE: by Carrie Johnson - National Public Radio

The Obama administration has denied a bid by two Democratic governors to reconsider how it treats marijuana under federal drug control laws, keeping the drug for now, at least, in the most restrictive category for U.S. law enforcement purposes.

Drug Enforcement Administration chief Chuck Rosenberg says the decision is rooted in science. Rosenberg gave "enormous weight" to conclusions by the Food and Drug Administration that marijuana has "no currently accepted medical use in treatment in the United States," and by some measures, it remains highly vulnerable to abuse as the most commonly used illicit drug across the nation.

"This decision isn't based on danger. This decision is based on whether marijuana, as determined by the FDA, is a safe and effective medicine," he said, "and it's not."
Hundreds of advocates for marijuana legalization rally and smoke pot outside the White House in Washington, D.C. on April 02, 2016.

Marijuana is considered a Schedule I drug under the Controlled Substances Act, alongside heroin and LSD, while other, highly addictive substances including oxycodone and methamphetamine are regulated differently under Schedule II of the law. But marijuana's designation has nothing to do with danger, Rosenberg said.

 

IMG 0492 X3In a letter to the petitioners, Rhode Island Gov. Gina Raimondo, Washington Gov. Jay Inslee and New Mexico nurse practitioner Bryan Krumm, Rosenberg said doctors are responsible for treating patients, but the FDA makes decisions about drug safety: "Simply put, evaluating the safety and effectiveness of drugs is a highly specialized endeavor."

Tom Angell, chairman of Marijuana Majority, said in a statement that the decision was disappointing.

"President Obama always said he would let science — and not ideology — dictate policy, but in this case his administration is upholding a failed drug war approach instead of looking at real, existing evidence that marijuana has medical value," he wrote.

Most Americans support legalization, Angell wrote, and the federal government should at a minimum leave regulatory decisions to the states.

Drug enforcers insist they are supportive of efforts to advance scientific research on marijuana. The DEA said it has "never denied" an application from a researcher to use lawfully produced marijuana in a rigorous medical study, and Rosenberg pointed out that research continues on a variety of subjects, including the effects of smoking marijuana in human subjects.

A spokesman for the FDA said the agency shares "an interest in developing therapies from marijuana and its components and have taken aggressive, coordinated action to do so."
asdfA strain of high-cannabidiol marijuana is used to create extracts used in experimental epilepsy treatments.

The FDA added that well-controlled clinical trials represent the "most appropriate way" to advance scientific understanding and that the drug approval process gives the agency the important ability to determine whether a product meets the FDA criteria for safety and effectiveness.

In December 2015, federal authorities said, they made it easier for researchers conducting clinical trials on cannabidiol, a component of marijuana. Some scientists are studying whether the substance can help treat childhood epilepsy. "That would be a wonderful and welcome development," the DEA letter said, "but we insist that CBD research, or any research, be sound, scientific and rigorous before a product can be authorized for medical use."

What's more, federal authorities said, they are increasing the amount of marijuana available for legitimate research. They said they will open up new avenues for more people and institutions to manufacture marijuana for scientific purposes. Currently, the University of Mississippi is the only such site in the U.S.

"As long as folks abide by the rules, and we're going to regulate that, we want to expand the availability, the variety, the type of marijuana available to legitimate researchers," Rosenberg said. "If our understanding of the science changes, that could very well drive a new decision."

Click HERE to open AA-Rosenberg-Marijuana-Petition-Ltr-08-11-2016

Forty-two states and the District of Columbia allow some form of medical marijuana use, but the federal government has not taken that step despite prodding from federal lawmakers. Last month, the Democratic National Committee endorsed the idea of loosening federal restrictions on marijuana and "providing a reasoned platform for future legalization" in its platform.

For now, there remain two ways to change the federal government's classification of marijuana: for a host of federal agencies including the DEA and FDA to sign off; or for Congress to pass a law, and for the president to sign it.